+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 56

Thread: SIVAJI SEASON - ENDHAN PON VANNAME

  1. #31

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    KUALA LUMPUR
    Posts
    14
    Hi everybody, I wish to slightly contradict the popular belief that it was Ilayaraja who introduced fast-paced folk numbers through 'Annakili' (1976).

    Can anyone forget the ever green fast-tracked song 'Ennadi Raakama' (Pattikaada Pattanama 1972) and the combination of folk and western 'Kettukodi Urumimeylam' from the same film? It was MS Viswanathan who set this trend but surprisingly he did not take upon himself for spin-offs in subsequent films. But this very song was often repeated and remembered in many films for more than a decade after it was released. Such was its popularity. According to norms, a song is rendered classic if it survives for 10 years.

    KV Mahadevan did try his hand to be in the bandwagon by composing village based songs in the MGR starrer 'Pattikaatu Ponniah' (1973)but somehow it did not click.

    It can be recalled that MGR insisted that MSV tunes a village-based melodius song like the popular Shivaji starrer 'Aagaya Panthililae' (1973). It can safely assumed that MGR wanted to equal Shivaji in songs and tempo.

    It is my personal opinion that MSV songs are considered classics because it sans time and period. Ilayaraja's are popular for that particular period of time only. One has just to listen again to 'Ennadi Raakama' and 'Machanai Paarthingila' side by side to know it.

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    KUALA LUMPUR
    Posts
    14
    When MGR stopped acting in 1977 after becoming the Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu it was during this 'phasing out' period for veteran cine actors. During the mid seventies although it was MGR and Shivaji who held the roost second echolon actors like Muthuraman and Sivakumar were being cast as full-fledged heroes. Jai Shankar and Ravichandran were seen acting in low budget movies. Around this time Kamalhassan and Rajini and to a lesser extent Jaiganesh and Vijayakumar slowly started to exhibit their talents and were warmly received by the audience.

    For the record Muthuraman refused to act as a second echolon hero in the film 'Unakaaga Naan' (1976). His refusal irked Shivaji who made some negative comments and if I am not mistaken they (Shivaji and Muthuraman) were not paired thereafter due to bad blood between them.

    Viewers who were used to stereo-type and formula stories of the veteran actors warmly welcomed the refreshing changes. Kamalhassan claims that he was the pioneer in acting with moustaches drooping below the corners of the mouth. Hitherto, it was a pencilline moustache sported by all the leading actors. And what with the main characters playing the enti-hero subjects? It was unusual for the hero to portray negative scenes like binging on drinks and smoking and also getting away with serious pranks. The general audience who were tired welcome with open arms the new changes and trend.

    The mid seventies audience could relate to the new heroes unlike the old guys who were always 'teaching' on how to live life morally. In Kamal and Rajini viewers saw a reflection in themselves. The styles exhibited by Rajini was something so novel. Just a decade or so ago, it was Ravichandran who was known for his unique mannerism and dance styles. It almost had MGR worried because people started to call him (Ravichandran) 'chinna vaathiyar' as long shots of him appeared to be like MGR.

    In 'Naalai Namathey' (1975) the remake of 'Yaadon Ki Barat' Kamalhassan was booked to act as one of the brothers of MGR. Several scenes of Kamal were already shot and it was then that MGR realised that his role (MGR's) will be relegated to that of persona-non-grata. Yes, the audience support at that time was slowly shifting to newvave actors like Kamal and Rajini. He had Kamal removed and replaced him with Krishna, a Telugu actor who was not that popular with the Tamil audience.

    MGR was a shrewd thinker and had always had the audience pulse in his hand.

    In 'Naan Vazhavaiypen' Shivaji lived up his role minus the exaggerated emotions. In one scene, as he goes about searching for Michael (Rajini) he is shown smoking a cigeratte with his left hand and discarding the stub with a stylish flick. Well, if this scene was in the 60s era Shivaji would have received accolodes. But he was actually competing with a stylish villain of Rajini who had already made an impact with his unique styles in Tamil films. The audience was ready to accept him even in negative roles.

    I still remember ther audience waiting patiently for Rajini to appear in the second half of the movie. The moment he first appeared in the song scene 'Aagayam melae' the audience cheered him no end. When the fight scene between him and Shivaji was shown the audience support was for Rajini. Even the climax scene Rajini stole the show. This was in Malaysia so I could imagine how it will be in India. Shivaji too realised this change which is why he kept to a compressed acting whenever Rajini was cast alongside him. 'Viduthalai' (1985) and 'Padikaathavan' (1987) can be cited as examples.

    A tidbit on Babloo who acted as the younger brother of Shivaji in 'Naan Vazhavaipen' - it was generally believed at that time that it was a girl who acted in the small boy role. Yes, those days it was common for girls to act in boys' roles eg. Daisy Irani in 'Yaar Payyan' (1958). Babloo indeed looked like a girl at that time. But after seeing his adult roles in several movies and tv serials it was confirfmed that it is Babloo indeed. When his role as a transsexual in the 'Arase' serial became popular, a Tamil magazine, 'Rani' ran an interview with him whilst praising his natural acting. He then revealed that he has a soft spot for this unfortunate group of people because he has a son who has similar qualities. Little wonder why the audience was confused after seeing 'Naan Vazhavaiypen'.
    Mahendra Raj

  3. #33
    Hi Mahendra Raj,

    I fully agree with you that fast-paced folk numbers easily preceded the IR era by at least a decade or even more, perhaps. The prime example is the "Kumudam" song "Mama Mama" tuned by KVM. What about "Therodum Indha Seerana Madurayile" in "Baaga Pirivinai". Certainly it's a fast-paced folk no. in rural settings, a great composition by the VR duo.

    Regards,

    Ramaswamy

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Chennai
    Posts
    1,193
    திரு மகேந்திர ராஜ்...

    நீங்கள் சொன்னது முற்றிலும் உண்மையான விஷயங்கள். தமிழ்த்திரையில் இசையின் எழுச்சி 1976க்குப்பின் தான் வந்தது என்பது போன்ற ஒரு புரளி திட்டமிட்டு பரப்பப்பட்டு வந்தது உண்மை. ஆனால் அதை பொய்ப்பிப்பதுபோல இன்றைக்கும் தொலைக்காட்சிகளில் பழைய பாடல்களின் ஆதிக்கம் நிலைநாட்டப்பட்டு வருகிறது. விஸ்வனாதன் - ராமமூர்த்தி, கே.வி மகாதேவன், எம்.எஸ். விஸ்வனாதன் ஆகியோரின் பாடல்கள் இன்றைக்கும் மக்கள் மனதில் ஆட்சி செலுத்தி வருகின்றன.

    பத்தாண்டுகள் ஒரு பாடல் நிலைத்து நின்றால் அது காவியம் என்று நீங்கள் சொல்லியிருப்பது முற்றிலும் ஏற்புடையதே. அவ்வகையில் மெல்லிசை மன்னரின் 80 சதவீத பாடல்கள் காவியங்கள் என்பதில் சற்றும் ஐயமில்லை.

    பாப்புலர் நடிகர்கள் மட்டுமல்லாது, இடைக்கால நடிகர்கள் பற்றியும் நீங்கள் குறிப்பிட்டிருப்பது மகிழ்வைத்தருகிறது. குறிப்பாக ரவிச்சந்திரன் பற்றிய தகவல் (சாதாரணமாக, இவரைப்பற்றி மற்றவர்கள் சொல்வது அபூர்வம். அக்கால கட்டத்தில் வலம் வந்த இன்னொரு நடிகர் ஏ.வி.எம்.ராஜன்). ஒரு சின்ன திருத்தம், 'நாளை நமதே'யில் நடித்தவர் கிருஷ்ணா அல்ல, சந்திரமோகன்.

    திரு எஸ்.ராமசாமி.....

    நீங்கள் சொல்லியிருக்கும் பாடல் வரிசையில் மறக்காமல் சேர்த்துக்கொள்ள வேண்டிய பாடல் "தேருபா(ர்)க்க வந்திருக்கும் சித்திரப் பெண்ணே" (இரு துருவம்).
    Anbudan….. Saradha Prakash

  5. #35
    Dear Mahendra raj,

    Welcome to the thread. You have penned your thoughts with interesting data thrown in. But not sure whether it will be sweet music for everyone.

    Certain things, I beg to differ. You have written as if the anti - hero or negative character came to Tamil cinema only after the young crop came in, which is off the mark. Right from 1952 Oct 17th, when one young man ushered in a series of delectable variety of celluloid performances, this negative or anti - hero characters also formed a part of the same and people simply lapped it up. Again drinking and smoking by the Hero character was very much accepted even before 1977. In fact one of the biggest block busters of NT's career, Vasantha Maligai is a prime example of the so called trait.

    One more info about Naalai Namadhe was Sivakumar was booked for the second brother's role (done by Vijay Arora in the original) but it was changed. Kamal was booked for Tariq's role but I am not sure whether he particiapted in the shooting. SethuMadhavan, the director was like a God Father to Kamal in Malayalam (like KB in Tamil) who gave him the first break as the hero in his Kanyakumari, was particular about Kamal and Sivakumar, but ----. Later Siva did Marupakkam with KSS and Kamal did Nammavar with him.

    Expecting more from you

    Regards

  6. #36

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    KUALA LUMPUR
    Posts
    14
    Hi & thanks to Ramasamy, Sharada & Murali for your observations.

    Yes, Ramaswamy, you are right. 'Therodum' (Bhaga Pirivinai 1959) is a fast paced folk song. This was a period where the maestros MSV and TKR were slowly making inroads as the new generation music directors. Also at around this time Vedha's 'Dingiri dingalae' (Anbu Engey 1959) was so popular that it almost drowned the Bhaga Pirivinai number. But immediately prior to this no one can forget the evergreen 'Rock Rock Rock' song by MSV-TKR composed for 'Pathi Bakthi'(1958) sung by JP Chandrababu and Sundram. Perhaps it was a novel effort by the upcoming maestros to try an hand at classical and western fusion.

    Yes, Sharada, that number from 'Iru Dhruvam' (1971) is definitely a song to reckon with. And don't forget the equally fast-paced village socialist themed song in the MGR-starrer 'Oru Thaai Makkal' (1971/1972) titled 'Ingu Nalla Irukunum Ellorum' (by Kannadhasan) [remake of 'Ayee Milan Ki Bela'].

    Sorry, Murali I made a mistake by stating Krishna.

    By the way, anti-hero subjects played by the main character did not go well with the crowd in the fifties and sixties, 'Andha Naal' (1953) with Shivaji and 'Panakaari' with MGR are examples. My reliable sources told me that MGR bought the rights for 'Panakaari' later when he firmly established himself as a successful actor and destroyed the negatives lest his image gets dented. Even the film 'Paasam'(1962) where MGR plays an anti-hero subject and dies in the climax was not well received by the audience.

    When MGR started preaching the evils of drinking it was well received, so much so it was hard to find any heroes in the fifties, sixties and early seventies appearing in even social drinking scenes. The exception to this rule was where the hero gets depressed and goes on a drinking binge. But in the Hindi film industry social drinking by the heroes was generously shown.

    But if there be an actor who lived his role as a drunkard or a mild social drinker then it is none other than the great Shivaji who donned the alcholic role in 'Punar Jenmam' (1960). Thereafter he was cast in such drinking roles like 'Sorgam' (1971), 'Vasantha Maaligai' (1972) 'Neethi' (1973), 'Engal Thanga Raja' (1973), 'Gowram' (1974), 'Unakaaga Naan' (1976) 'Unnai Pol Oruvan' (1979) and 'Thyagam' (1979). No one can forget the famous social drinking scene in a Singapore night club where Shivaji sips whilst watching Sowcar Janaki singing 'Paartha Nyabagam Illaiyo' (Puthiya Paravai 1964). No other leading or secondary actor was typecast for such roles until the new generation artistes appeared in the late seventies.

    In the 'Dhairyamaaga Chol nee' song in 'Olivilakku' (1968) MGR took care not to be seen as drinking wilfully. The scene was made out as though he was forced upon against his will. Of course, it was just the opposite what Dharmendra did in 'Phool Aur Patthar' (original version of 'Oli Vilakku'). Remember, in Hindi films it was accepted. So you can see that MGR who had the general audience pulse in his hand took great care so as not to cause damage the sentiments of the people.

    However, I stand corrected to whatever I have mentioned above.

    A tidbit before I round up today's posting. Those who are in India would have watched the climax scene where the hero, Shivaji dies in 'Vasantha Maaligai'. But in Malaysia and Singapore, the climax scene depicts Shivaji recovering after the bout of poison he took earlier. It was a happy ending where Shivaji embraces Vaanishree with smiles all over. Even Kumudham, the leading Tamil weekly commented on this duality in its write up after being alerted by one of its readers. The producers reasoned out that overseas audience will never accept a hero dying at the end hence the two climax scenes - one for domestic and the other for overseas!
    Mahendra Raj

  7. #37
    Hi,

    Another unforgettable song to be added to the list is "Muthu Kulikka Vareegala". How the Thoothukudi "solvazhakku" is interwoven with some splendid bgm can be experienced by listening to this wonderful fast-paced folkish no. from KB's "Anubhavi Raja Anubhavi". And the way LRE and TMS sing simply takes this song to a higher plane.

    Paens have been written abt TMS's ability to modulate his voice as per the on-screen actor for whom he sings. He has sung superbly for Sivaji Ganesan, MGR, Jaishankar and, for this no., Nagesh. How his voice suits Nagesh can be found by listening to "Muthu Kuliikka", "Madras Nalla Madras" (from the same film) and "Varavu Ettana Selavu Patthana" from KB's 'Bama Vijayam".

    Like Saradha madam has said it's a misconception that fastish folk nos were started by IR. It was in vogue even in the great GR's era, one prime example being "Kattukkulle kanda poovu ennai mayakkudu" from "Naan Petra Selvam".

    Regards

    Ramaswamy

  8. #38
    I also think that IR is appreciated for the wrong reasons. It isnt necessary to shame his predecessors to praise him. Himself, he is a great fan of MSV, and he never misses an opportunity to mention that he just took MSV's way forward.

    At the same time, what cannot be denied is that he brought in a new paradigm to music in tamil films and that wasnt his folk-tunes. In fact, much of that image may have to do with the gramathu raja title he received from his detractors initially. Talk of self-defeating barbs at your rivals:-).

    What he brought in the context of folk songs might be defined by the TMS song in his first film. TMS, with his pedigree and background, objected to the raw lyrics and enunciation envisaged by Raja for Annakili. And that could be the reason why the illusion that Raja brough the real Tamizhnattu gramam to the fore multiplied. I mean, we had the folk songs earlier also, but then the lyrics? - the lyrics were chaste tamil, and that was the case with dialgoues, too. That might have created the illusion of Annakili ushering in a new era where the raw, unrefined enunciation of a thekathi gramathan was recorded in the tamil annals.
    This could be interpreted in two ways - and it was. The supporters called it bringing in realism. The detractors called it destruction of the classical music framework and the phasing out of 'decent' tamil.

    Now, I know you are going to say "Ammadi Ponnukku Thanga Manasu? Therefore, Eureka, Plum, you are wrong" but the point is it still carried TMS's sophistication much as he tried to infuse rawness. You cant compare the rawness in that song to the rawness in Solam Vedhaikkiyile. This is not TMS' failing.
    To explain this, I can take an unrelated example. Sanjay Dutt could arguably said to have better-performed the role in Munnabhai than Kamal in Vasool Raja. But them Sanjay didnt have to act - the soft-hearted, idiotic, brawn-full Goonda role is close to his real life personality whereas Kamal's intelligence shines through his eyes and therefore, in comparison, his performance in that role could be lesser than Dutt's.
    I am not taking this as an exact parallel because I consider IR and MSV both equal geniuses but as a singer, IR vs TMS could well be the same as Dutt vs Kamal as actors. Sanjay Dutt has one role that he can perform better than Kamal - that is, the role of Dutt. Similarly, IR brings in the unrefined rawness of a gramathan much better than TMS. As I said, this isnt TMS' failing - just that he was too well-trained as a singer to exude rawness from every pore of his voice as IR does. And it is not any special quality of IR that he can do rawness beautifully. That is just a God given gift to him, just as technically brilliant singing is God given to TMS.

  9. #39
    Dear Mahendra raj,

    It was nice of you to withdraw your comments. But I didn't mean that way. Just as you pointed out the propagation of the wrong notion that folk music started to bloom only after 1976, I mentioned that it is wrong to say that negative or anti - hero characters were accepted only after 1977. That's all.

    But one small correction regarding Vasantha Maaligai. even in India it was only happy ending. the only place where it was shown differently was in Kerala, where the film was shown to end after he talks to Vanishree and falls down with blood coming out from his mouth. This was because Kerala audience would always love such realistic ending.

    Plum,

    Nice articulative post.

    Mr.Ramaswamy,

    Good you brought up Anubhavi raja Anubhavi songs.

    Regards

  10. #40

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    KUALA LUMPUR
    Posts
    14
    Hi everbody!

    I just happened to click the archives of this thread and wow! what an indepth articulation on the birth of 'Engey Nimmadhi' and 'Ellorum Kondaduvom'! Mind you I just completed reading this two only for now. A doctorate can be easily bestowed on Murali!

    I always have this sneaky feeling that if die-hard fans of Tamil films and music of yesteryears were computer savvy and who happen to know about this topic surely they would also contribute tremendously with hitherto unpublicised information.

    When Shivaji Films celebrated its '50th film' (well that was what down here we thought so) we were cracking our heads starting from 'Puthiya Paravai' to count all the Shivaji Productions. Alas, we gave up. It was news to me after reading this thread that it was actually their 50th anniversary of existence. Murali, you truly deserve more than a pat on your back for enlightening us on the history of Shivaji Productions!!

    I remember reading an article by Cho a very, very long time ago on NT. He seriously asked him as to why he is exaggerating his acting with unnatural emotions and gestures which were then seen as overdoing by critics. This was in the seventies. NT, as though expecting this criticsm from Cho, casually acted out a scene or rather a page taken out of a Hollywood film. With a straight face and upright posture, minus his usual gestures, he spoke the dialogue in Tamil but in a low key voice. Cho was mesmerised by this acting and immediately commented that he (NT) can equal the likes of a pure bred Hollywood artiste. NT told him that such a style of acting, a -la -Hollywood will be well received by the English-movie going fans only but not with the masses at large.

    That goes to show that NT was all the while fully aware of the adverse comments by his critics but he had the obligation to fulfil the producers who cater to the general audience. To a certain extent 'Puthiya Paravai' brought out the latent Hollywood talents of NT.

    Elsewhere in this thread I came across the information that from 'Deepam' onwards Balaji used IR for his productions especially after the success of 'Thyagam'. But for 'Billa' (1980), 'Thee' (1982), 'Savaal' (1981) and 'Sujatha' (1982) Balaji booked MSV for the musical score. What made Balaji revert to MSV, his erstwhile MD? Ironically it was Gangai Amaran and not IR for 'Vazhvey Maayam' (1982), another Balaji's production. Can anybody enlighten on this?
    Mahendra Raj

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts